Walker Type Specimen Book

As a typography course assignment I designed a complex narrative through 4 spreads to incrementally introduce a typeface. The chosen typeface was Walker designed by Matthew Carter for the Walker Museum of Art.

TOOLS USED

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& PENCIL  SKETCHES

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A Simplified Linear Version of an Iterative Process

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Client

 a professional designer  with 20 years experience in typography

Client's Actual Goal

receive a 4 spread type specimen book that displays a high level understanding of typographic principles

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Walker is a variable all capital typeface designed for Walker Art Musuem. There are nearly infinite combinations of serifs, letters and rules.
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Convey the history of Walker and the narrative possibilities of Walker application through type application and visuals.

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Using maps to reference Walker typeface's museum history and to suggest infinite application possibilities.

Colorstory and moodboard.

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Visible grids. Color and grid complexity introduced incrementally. Grid eventually becomes a background element indicating scale and depth. Letterforms become foreground characters!
Limitation
The typeface was never released to the public. I had to create all the characters by hand by tracing images of the typeface.
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Limitations from Client
1. Must have a timeline
2. Must have every character of the typeface
3. Minimal use of photo
4. Must contain a lot of body copy
 
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As the book is read, the complexity of the typographic grid increases, the use of color increases and the unconventional use of Walker type increases. It creates an well paced explanation of Walker typeface and an inspiring example for possible uses.
The client (my professor) was extremely pleased and recommended me to the Kent State MFA program, believing I had much to contribute to design industry discourse.